E-learning NET

Posts Tagged ‘teacher

Boulder Valley School District sees benefits to 3D lessons, including stronger student engagement and better retention

In a survey of high school students involved in the pilot, 76 percent said they preferred learning in 3D over traditional methods.

In one of the first significant studies of the effects of three-dimensional content on K-12 instruction, Colorado’s Boulder Valley School District (BVSD) found that the use of 3D content helped increase student engagement and led to better achievement in some cases—with the lowest-performing students seeing the greatest benefits. Читать далее…

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As overcrowded classrooms, crunched school district budgets, and online, open learning become more prominent in lower and higher education — for better or worse — teachers and students are feeling stretched in many directions. While the hoped for result in democratic learning is that we’ll all be more connected, the truth is that we’re also losing valuable face time and struggling to find new ways to bring the world back to students. Avatars are being used to help these challenges, by helping younger students contextualize history lessons, giving teachers more direct training before they even meet students, and more. Here are 10 amazing ways avatars are being used in education.

  1. Training teachers: One of the more popular ways that avatars are being used in education is for teacher training. As part of a new research program at the University of Central Florida, specially designed avatars realistically imitate different types of students to help teachers practice classroom management and relate to their students. The training teachers stand in front of a projection screen, on which they see avatars that are being controlled — or acted out — by actual university students trained to behave a certain way. Other noises or outbursts like laughing or obnoxious sound effects are thrown in, too, to keep the trainee on his or her toes. Читать далее…

There are different types of e-learning courses. I going to draw a divide between public and private sector courses purely to help my thinking. The divide is, of course, not that simple but it’s a useful starting point for this post.

Appearance is the most obvious difference and this is down to money. The content of the private sector world is dynamically displayed, well designed and often involves bespoke video. The interaction is with the software and often restricted to the odd multiple choice instant feedback job. It’s mostly about absorbing the content. It’s more about web design than learning design. Pedagogy is firmly didactic and pedagogical thought seems lacking.

For the public sector, there is little money to sink into creating content to the same dynamic, multimedia standard. One area I am starting to explore is the easy creation of web content so that educators are less likely to whack on a powerpoint or word document. Making the content bespoke to a purely online course is an important step which many have not taken. The DIY nature means that it seems less valid to just put content up. They need to look good for this to work. Within education, there is unwritten understanding that learning activities are required regardless of this. However, I’m sure some would make do with just providing content if they could. Hiding behind making the content dynamic would make this easier. Читать далее…

So you have heard about blogging with your students and you are considering taking the plunge but just not sure what or how to do it? I am here to tell you; blogging with my students has been one of the most enriching educational experiences we have had this year, and that says a lot. So to get you started, here is what I have learned:

  1. Pick an easy platform, both for you and the students. I used Kidblog with great success, it fit our needs, it is free and it offers easy moderation.  There are other great alternatives out there such as WordPress or EduBlogs
  2. Teach them how to blog first. We did an excellent paper blogging lesson first (found on the blog of McTeach), which brought up why we were blogging and how to do it appropriately.  This got the students excited, interested as well as got them thinking about what great comments look and sound like.
  3. Talk safety! We assume some students know how to be safe, but don’t assume it; teach them the do’s and dont’s. I came up with the lesson of why the Internet is like the mall and it really worked.  I also sent home safety plans for students and parents to discuss and we discussed it throughout the year.
  4. Teach them how to comment. In order for blogging to be effective, comments are needed, but if students don’t know how to properly comment they will lose out on part of the experience. We discuss how to thank people, how to answer their questions, and most importantly, how to ask questions back. This is all part of common conversational knowledge that all kids should be taught any way. Читать далее…

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Обновления Twitter

  • Иду на вебинар “Вебинар как источник дохода” goo.gl/jmbCP 5 years ago
  • 47 Alternatives to Using YouTube in the Classroom. freetech4teachers.com/2010/09/47-alt… 6 years ago
  • Более 1/3 студентов в США изучают 1 курс онлайн, за 5 лет доля e-learning вырастет на 30-50%. Университеты пустеют. bit.ly/uMzqZP 6 years ago
  • Сегодня в рамках конференции Дистанционное образование 2011 проходила трансляция секционных и пленарных заседаний webinary.biz/joinHiddenWebi… 6 years ago
  • Переводить выражение "облачные технологии" на украинский язык действительно не хочется: "облака" по-украински - "хмары"... :-) 6 years ago